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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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New Chairwoman of the NC Commission of Indian Affairs Sworn-in Today

Written by Featured Organization on 13 September 2013.

John Travis Holt Main Office: 919-807-4440 Fax: 919-807-4461  Mailing Address:  1317 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-1317The NC Commission of Indian Affairs is holding its annual Commission meeting today from 10:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. at the Embassy Suites Hotel–Crabtree in Raleigh. The agenda includes addresses by Governor Pat McCrory, Secretary of Administration Bill Daughtridge, and Justice Paul Newby will swear-in the new Chairwoman of the Commission, Mrs. Ruth Revels. 

 

Chairwoman Revels, an enrolled member of the Lumbee Indian tribe, has served as a member of the Commission since 2003. She has vast experience with American Indian issues through her work as Chairwoman of the Commission’s Economic Development and Employment Committee, NC Indian Economic Development Initiative, and her service as the first Executive Director of the Guilford Native American Association in Greensboro.

“Outreach to American Indian communities is important to North Carolina,” said Secretary Bill Daughtridge. “Ms. Revels possesses the background, knowledge and skills needed to accomplish great things for these communities as the new leader of the Commission.”

According to the 2010 US Census, 122,100 American Indians call North Carolina home, which is the largest American Indian population of any state east of the Mississippi River. NC has eight statutory tribes and four Indian Associations. Addressing the needs of these communities is the primary work of the NC Commission of Indian Affairs.

“The NC Commission of Indian Affairs does an excellent job of administering programs that meet the specific needs of the American Indian population in North Carolina,” said Greg Richardson, Director of the NC Commission of Indian Affairs. “We are looking forward to Chairwoman Revels’ vision and leadership as our new leader.”

For more information, please visit the NC Commission of Indian Affairs online, or contact Greg Richardson at 919-807-4440.

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