Every Year, Millions Try to Navigate US Courts Without a Lawyer

Eighty percent of state criminal defendants cannot afford to pay for a lawyer, and only those who are actually incarcerated are constitutionally entitled to appointed counsel.

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ACLU of Missouri Files Lawsuit against City of St. Louis For Unconstitutional Police Conduct

The ACLU of Missouri filed a lawsuit today against the city of St. Louis for unlawful and unconstitutional actions against people during the Stockley verdict demonstrations.

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William C. Friday Fellowship for Human Relations: Announcing the Friday Fellowship Class of 2017-2019

These leaders learn to model former UNC system president Bill Friday’s civility, transparency, and collaboration across divergent ideas and identities.

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This Week’s GDN eNews Email Edition: The Color of Law

View this week’s email update: eNews is delivered to your inbox each week with book reviews, videos, inspiring stories, NAACP events and our latest jobs. Read the latest edition here.

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I Can’t Visit My Sons in Prison Because I Have Unpaid Traffic Tickets

It breaks you down mentally, emotionally. I think about my kids all the time, just all the time. They’ve been in there for years, and it never gets any better to not be able to see them.

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NAACP Calls for the Respect of Constitutional Rights After the Acquittal of Jason Stockley

Anthony Lamar Smith's death, and the deaths of countless other victims of police brutality in Missouri, is exactly why the NAACP issued a travel advisory to the state …

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Books of Knowledge

Educate, Organize, Mobilize.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

By Richard Rothstein
The laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments—that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. There is no better history of this troubled journey than “The Color of Law.”

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Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

Author Cate Lineberry
It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old enslaved man named Robert Smalls boldly seized a Confederate steamer.

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A Colony in a Nation

America likes to tell itself that it inhabits a postracial world, yet nearly every empirical measure—wealth, unemployment, incarceration, school segregation—reveals that racial inequality has barely improved since 1968, when Richard Nixon became our first “law and order” president.

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GDN Northeast N.C.

Spotlights, Local News and Events

William C. Friday Fellowship for Human Relations: Announcing the Friday Fellowship Class of 2017-2019

These leaders learn to model former UNC system president Bill Friday’s civility, transparency, and collaboration across divergent ideas and identities.

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Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law: Constitutional Responsibility for Right to Sound Basic Education

Despite the ruling today, this lawsuit and our organizing around it has lifted the hopes of parents and community advocates in Halifax County  who believe that change is possible …

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New Guide That Helps You To Identify, Achieve, Measure, and Optimize Your “Happiness Index”

Are you as happy as you think you are? There is now a revolutionary resource with an insightful premise supported by detailed research.

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