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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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POST-9/11 “TURBAN MYTHS” IN AMERICA

Written by Featured Organization on 09 September 2013.

New Research Shows Most Americans Misidentify Turban-Wearers In U.S.

PALO ALTO, CALIF. – In a groundbreaking new study titled “Turban Myths,” researchers at SALDEF (Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund) and Stanford University found that 70 percent of Americans misidentify turban-wearers as Muslim (48 percent), Hindu, Buddhist or Shinto.  In fact, almost all men in the U.S. who wear turbans are Sikh Americans, whose faith originated in India.



Other key findings:

  • Americans associate turban-wearers with Osama bin Laden, more than with named Muslim and Sikh alternatives and more than with no one in particular
  • 49 percent of Americans believe “Sikh” is a sect of Islam (it is an independent religion)
  • 70 percent cannot identify a Sikh man in a picture as a Sikh
  • 79 percent cannot identify India as the geographic origin of Sikhism 

“This research is critical to our community and confirms our real, lived experiences,” said Jasjit Singh, executive director of SALDEF.  “We also know that we most effectively bridge these perception gaps when fellow Americans come to know us as the teachers, doctors, coaches, Moms, Dads, brothers, sisters, friends, neighbors and community servants we are.  This study provides a roadmap for creating the mutual understanding and recognition of shared values that can help us build an American community larger than ourselves, and one that includes Sikh Americans as full participants.”

Sikh Americans suffered the deadliest act of violence against a religious minority on Aug. 5, 2012 when a white supremacist stormed a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.  Six Sikh Americans were killed.  A Sikh American targeted expressly because of his turban was also the first fatality after 9/11 in a series of backlash crimes.

The study was overseen by Stanford University researcher and Peace Innovation Lab co-director Margarita Quihuis.  It involved surveys, social science research and extensive interviews of influencers in the Sikh and civil rights community.

“Coming from the world of peace innovation we see a real path forward as a result of this research,” said Quihuis.  “The bottom line is that these misperceptions are caught, not taught.  Good people make associations based on imagery and messages all around them -- from the grocery store to television to the digital world.  In this case the Sikh American community has an opportunity to fill those perception gaps with the truth, in a constructive way to foster peace.”