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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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POST-9/11 “TURBAN MYTHS” IN AMERICA

Written by Featured Organization on 09 September 2013.

New Research Shows Most Americans Misidentify Turban-Wearers In U.S.

PALO ALTO, CALIF. – In a groundbreaking new study titled “Turban Myths,” researchers at SALDEF (Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund) and Stanford University found that 70 percent of Americans misidentify turban-wearers as Muslim (48 percent), Hindu, Buddhist or Shinto.  In fact, almost all men in the U.S. who wear turbans are Sikh Americans, whose faith originated in India.



Other key findings:

  • Americans associate turban-wearers with Osama bin Laden, more than with named Muslim and Sikh alternatives and more than with no one in particular
  • 49 percent of Americans believe “Sikh” is a sect of Islam (it is an independent religion)
  • 70 percent cannot identify a Sikh man in a picture as a Sikh
  • 79 percent cannot identify India as the geographic origin of Sikhism 

“This research is critical to our community and confirms our real, lived experiences,” said Jasjit Singh, executive director of SALDEF.  “We also know that we most effectively bridge these perception gaps when fellow Americans come to know us as the teachers, doctors, coaches, Moms, Dads, brothers, sisters, friends, neighbors and community servants we are.  This study provides a roadmap for creating the mutual understanding and recognition of shared values that can help us build an American community larger than ourselves, and one that includes Sikh Americans as full participants.”

Sikh Americans suffered the deadliest act of violence against a religious minority on Aug. 5, 2012 when a white supremacist stormed a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.  Six Sikh Americans were killed.  A Sikh American targeted expressly because of his turban was also the first fatality after 9/11 in a series of backlash crimes.

The study was overseen by Stanford University researcher and Peace Innovation Lab co-director Margarita Quihuis.  It involved surveys, social science research and extensive interviews of influencers in the Sikh and civil rights community.

“Coming from the world of peace innovation we see a real path forward as a result of this research,” said Quihuis.  “The bottom line is that these misperceptions are caught, not taught.  Good people make associations based on imagery and messages all around them -- from the grocery store to television to the digital world.  In this case the Sikh American community has an opportunity to fill those perception gaps with the truth, in a constructive way to foster peace.”