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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Regulators Need More Funding to Enforce Finance Reform

Written by Washington University in St. Louis on 25 June 2010.

The U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representative are working toward a final version of the financial reform bill, which is expected be on the desk of President Barack Obama by July 4. According to Hillary A. Sale, JD, securities law expert and professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis, the bill is coming at a good time for the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC).

“The proposed financial reforms will improve the SEC’s funding and attempt to regulate financial instruments that have not been regulated before — including derivatives,” Sale says. “A new layer of financial regulators has developed over the last decade in the U.S., largely because the SEC has been underfunded.

"State regulators now have become important players in major financial scandals, often preceding the SEC in detection and enforcement," Sale says.

Sale notes that regulators can’t be fully insulated from political pressures. “Better funding for regulators would help lessen the pressure,” she says.

Under the current state of the SEC and financial regulation, financial institutions position themselves to fall within the jurisdiction of the most accommodating regulator, and investment banks design new financial products so as to encounter the least regulatory oversight.

Credit rating agencies

Sale says that the possible conflicts between consumer protection and bank regulation are not easily resolved. As an example, she says that credit rating agencies are “horribly conflicted.”

“The main problem is that issuers pay for rating agency reviews,” Sale says. “Rating agencies can’t survive without giving good reviews.

"Unless we deal with these conflicts, reforms are likely to be ineffective," she says.

Sale, along wtih John C. Coffee Jr., JD, discussed regulatory oversight in Redesigning the SEC: Does the Treasury Have a Better Idea? in the June 2009 edition of the Virginia Law Review.