You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials
Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Research Duke Medicine

  DURHAM, N.C. – A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress.

Read More...
Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

Read More...
Voter Suppression:  One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

Voter Suppression: One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

By Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Around 30 days and counting, this election season is in the home stretch.  The highest profile race is for US Senate between Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis.  

Read More...
Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

by Peter Grear

As we draw nearer to D-day, November 4, 2014, the political parties, candidates and pressure groups are identifying their issues, slates and strategies to win.  My title to this week’s commentary makes a gross understatement, judges matter. 

Read More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

Poverty's Most Dreaded Consequence

Written by Featured Organization on 27 January 2011.

Even though the Great Recession has officially ended, the continuing high mass unemployment has led to a small but growing increase in homelessness, particularly of families. This development is a change from the pattern of the past in which the homeless population was more likely to be comprised of people individuals with significant drug or alcohol abuse problems, or those with significant mental health problems, or those who had been mired in poverty.

Now, the percentage of families new to homelessness has outstripped that of individuals who have become newly homeless, according to a report, "States of Homelessness in America," released this month by the National Alliance to End Homelessness and the Homelessness Research Institute.

The numbers involved are as yet relatively small. The overall national homeless population of 656,129 increased by three percent, and the number of families within that group increased by four percent, or 3,200 families. But, 31 states and the District of Columbia experienced increases in their homeless populations. Further, the report said widespread agreement exists that there is a "vast undercount" of homeless youth who are not attached to a family unit. And finally, the report covers only the period from 2008 to 2009, meaning that the data on the year from 2009 to 2010 has yet to be tabulated.

That was the harshest year of the Great Recession, when the accumulating mass layoffs produced significant increases in both the total number of Americans in poverty – it soared by four million to 43.6 million — and in the growth of individuals and families living in poverty in suburbia.

Those two developments alone mean there has likely been a further substantial increase in homelessness in the last year as well.

For example, according to figures compiled separately by New York City officials and homeless advocates, the number of people living on the streets and in the subways skyrocketed by 34 percent from 2009 to 2010 – a sharp reversal of the declines that had occurred in recent years. City officials attributed the surge to the national economic crisis.

Its authors conclude that the report's findings "project a disquieting picture of what depressed wages, stagnant unemployment, [an] unrelenting housing cost burden, and the lagging pace of economic recovery [has produced]: increased homelessness and heightened risk of homelessness for more and more Americans." They urge that a more strategic use of government and private-sector resources and funds must be devised in order to stem the growth of homelessness.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

GDN Link Exchange