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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Poverty's Most Dreaded Consequence

Written by Featured Organization on 27 January 2011.

Even though the Great Recession has officially ended, the continuing high mass unemployment has led to a small but growing increase in homelessness, particularly of families. This development is a change from the pattern of the past in which the homeless population was more likely to be comprised of people individuals with significant drug or alcohol abuse problems, or those with significant mental health problems, or those who had been mired in poverty.

Now, the percentage of families new to homelessness has outstripped that of individuals who have become newly homeless, according to a report, "States of Homelessness in America," released this month by the National Alliance to End Homelessness and the Homelessness Research Institute.

The numbers involved are as yet relatively small. The overall national homeless population of 656,129 increased by three percent, and the number of families within that group increased by four percent, or 3,200 families. But, 31 states and the District of Columbia experienced increases in their homeless populations. Further, the report said widespread agreement exists that there is a "vast undercount" of homeless youth who are not attached to a family unit. And finally, the report covers only the period from 2008 to 2009, meaning that the data on the year from 2009 to 2010 has yet to be tabulated.

That was the harshest year of the Great Recession, when the accumulating mass layoffs produced significant increases in both the total number of Americans in poverty – it soared by four million to 43.6 million — and in the growth of individuals and families living in poverty in suburbia.

Those two developments alone mean there has likely been a further substantial increase in homelessness in the last year as well.

For example, according to figures compiled separately by New York City officials and homeless advocates, the number of people living on the streets and in the subways skyrocketed by 34 percent from 2009 to 2010 – a sharp reversal of the declines that had occurred in recent years. City officials attributed the surge to the national economic crisis.

Its authors conclude that the report's findings "project a disquieting picture of what depressed wages, stagnant unemployment, [an] unrelenting housing cost burden, and the lagging pace of economic recovery [has produced]: increased homelessness and heightened risk of homelessness for more and more Americans." They urge that a more strategic use of government and private-sector resources and funds must be devised in order to stem the growth of homelessness.

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