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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Thurgood Marshall College Fund Focuses on Developing Black CEOs

Thurgood Marshall College Fund Focuses on Developing Black CEOs

Developing Black CEOs

According to research conducted by Richard Zweigenhaft, a psychology professor at Guilford College in Greensboro, N.C., though Blacks account for more than 13 percent of the U.S. population, 

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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How to Turn Personal Obstacles into Triumphs

How to Turn Personal Obstacles into Triumphs

(StatePoint) Everyone faces setbacks in life.

While those personal obstacles can lead to disappointing outcomes, they can also be harnessed into personal motivators, say experts. 

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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New Report Details Experience of Minority Women in the Subprime Lending Market and Disparate Treatment by Race

Written by Special from the Louisiana Weekly on 19 June 2009.

WASHINGTON (NNPA) - Ninety years after the passage of the 19th amendment by Congress, a new report for the National Council of Negro Women researched by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) shows that African-American and Latino women continue to receive disparate treatment in the mortgage lending process. The report, Assessing the Double Burden: Examining Racial and Gender Disparities in Mortgage Lending, demonstrates that minorities continue to be much more likely to receive high-cost home mortgage loans.

In many instances, disparities by race widened as income levels increased, one of many indicators that discrimination remains a reality in home mortgage lending, as reports by the Federal Reserve and others have documented.

''The financial crisis has demonstrated that the key to a robust and sustainable economy is the inclusion and full participation of all households in an efficiently functioning and responsible financial system,'' said John Taylor, president and CEO of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition. ''African Americans and Latinos continue to be treated unfairly when receiving a loan. This report documents troubling lending disparities that threaten to undermine the wealth and security of the most financially vulnerable Americans.''

Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever of the National Council of Negro Women adds, ''In an era of change, this report shows that there is still much more work to be done. Given the importance of homeownership to families and entire communities, it becomes clear that we simply cannot rest until every person, regardless of race or gender, is treated fairly at every stage of the mortgage lending process. Results like those uncovered by this study make it painfully clear that for far too many, fair treatment in mortgage lending remains an elusive and still unfulfilled goal.''

The report examined data collected under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act for the year 2007 (the latest year for which data is publicly available) for 100 of the largest Metropolitan areas (MSAs) in the country. The report includes a ranking of MSAs by worst overall disparities. Among the findings:

• Middle- and upper-income African-American females were at least twice as likely to receive high-cost loans as middle- and upper-income white females in more than 84 percent of the MSAs

• Low- and moderate- income African-American females were at least twice as likely to receive high-cost loans as low- and moderate-income white females in 70 percent of the MSAs

• Middle- and upper-income Hispanic females were at least twice as likely to receive high-cost loans as middle- and upper-income white females in almost 62 percent of the MSAs

• Low- and moderate-income Hispanic females were at least twice as likely as low- and moderate-income white females to receive high-cost loans in 32 percent of the MSAs.