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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Working This Summer? Students Need to be Tax Savvy, Too

Written by Rowan University on 29 June 2010.

In these difficult financial times it is common for college students to engage in some part-time work while juggling regular semester coursework or, at a minimum, take that obligatory summer job.

Any level of paid remuneration will trigger a potential tax liability for the student, and in some cases involving unearned income, the parent may wind up paying the tax, according to Rick Marmon, an associate professor of accounting in the Rohrer College of Business at Rowan University, Glassboro, N.J. who holds advanced degrees in business, law and tax and is a certified public accountant, certified management accountant and licensed attorney.

There are a couple of planning considerations that anyone with working kids should know that will help make reporting a little less taxing in the new year, said Marmon, who teaches taxation courses in the undergraduate and graduate business programs.

First, children under the age of 24 who are full-time students at least some part of five months during the year are generally considered dependents of their parents. Dependents are not entitled to reduce their taxable income by their personal exemption ($3,650 for 2010), which means that once a child earns more than $5,700 (his/her standard deduction), he/she will have a tax liability.

One thing that a working youth should do is file a W-4 with his/her employer exempting him/her from tax withholding if his/her projected earnings are less than $5,700. There is little need to waste time and money filing a tax return when the child ultimately will get a refund of all taxes withheld during the year, Marmon said.

Second, if a child has unearned income exceeding $1,900, he/she will have to pay tax on the excess at his/her parent’s marginal tax rate. This provision was added to the Internal Revenue Code to prevent parents from reducing their taxes by putting their stocks and CDs in their childrens’ names. The “kiddie tax,” as it is known, applies to children under 18 years of age or under age 24 who are full-time students and whose earned income does not exceed half of their support (excluding scholarships).

Another issue involving working kids is the dreaded “self-employment tax.” If a child is engaged in some type of work that is considered self-employment income and he/she earns more than $433, he/she must pay a 15.3-percent self-employment tax in addition to any federal income tax required. Self-employment income includes any money earned that is not reported on a W-2 by an employer. For instance, that summer lawn business or odd-job business is subject to self-employment tax; however, babysitters have been held to be employees of the parents for whom they are working and are not subject to the tax.

In addition to the federal tax issues, most states require some form of reporting and/or tax obligation for student workers. Addition detail and instructions can be found in IRS Publication 929: Tax Rules for Children and Dependents.