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Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Research Duke Medicine

  DURHAM, N.C. – A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress.

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 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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Voter Suppression:  One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

Voter Suppression: One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

By Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Around 30 days and counting, this election season is in the home stretch.  The highest profile race is for US Senate between Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis.  

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Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

by Peter Grear

As we draw nearer to D-day, November 4, 2014, the political parties, candidates and pressure groups are identifying their issues, slates and strategies to win.  My title to this week’s commentary makes a gross understatement, judges matter. 

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A Brave New World for College Grads: Hunting Down a Job in a Tough Economy

Written by Saint Joseph's University on 17 February 2009.

Unfortunately, in an economy like today’s, Matthew Brink, director of Career Development at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, has no secret tricks for landing a job. “It’s all about using the tried and true tactics for job hunting, but giving the process more time and effort,” he says.

Those tactics, according to Brink, include networking, targeting your job search, and responding to postings.

“We’re telling students the same things we’ve always told them: start early, share you resume with the career services office, attend the many networking events our office hosts throughout the year.”

Brink has the numbers to prove he’s not just blowing smoke. Surveys conducted by the University’s Career Development Center consistently show that graduates who make use of their services land jobs sooner and make more money. In 2008 alone, graduates who sought the help of the Center while at SJU are making nearly $12,000 more annually compared to those who went at it alone.

Brink says the first of those “tried and true tactics” he preaches about every year, networking, is especially critical in today’s market. Along with downsizing comes the shrinking of human resources staff and recruiters.

“We see companies beginning to limit their job postings as a cost savings,” he explains. “They move from marketing to gatekeeping. Students who leverage their contacts with alumni may be able to get on the inside track.”

“What job –seeking college grads may need to consider in this climate is compromise,” Brink adds. “If the goal is to sell pharmaceuticals, I say try selling other consumer goods like food or air conditioners, and sell them well. If the goal is to work for a Big Four accounting firm, consider a smaller one until the economy rebounds.”

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