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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Tough Job Market Can Mean Good News for New College Graduates

Written by Wake Forest University on 30 March 2010.

Although this year’s cohort of college graduates is facing one of the toughest job markets in decades, they actually have an advantage over other job seekers, according to Andy Chan, vice president of career development at Wake Forest University. They are among the age group most likely to be hired and also will be acquiring valuable job hunting skills that will serve them well in the future.

“If I could be anyone in this job market who is unemployed, who would I want to be? A new college graduate,” Chan says. “Organizations are very interested in hiring young people because they have a lot of energy and are willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done.”

New college graduates also have an advantage because they don’t have the financial obligations of older workers with families and can be very open-minded regarding their choice of job since they are at the start of their careers, Chan said.

“The National Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the average worker will hold 10 to 14 different jobs by the time they are 38,” Chan said. “Although some of those might be within the same organization, students really need to learn be resilient in today’s job market.

“I find that the years when the market is down can offer some advantages because students have to work to find jobs and later in their lives they’re not as anxious about finding work because they have had the experience of looking for a job,” he said. “Those who had it too easy with two or three job offers right out of college are often in shock and totally unprepared if they later find themselves unemployed.”

Chan warns, however, that job hunting is not for the fainthearted. It could take dozens of interviews and several months to land the right job. He also says new graduates have a better chance of success if they can avoid the five most common job hunting mistakes of college seniors:

1. Overusing the Internet –“Students in this digital age think if they apply to enough jobs online then someone will eventually want to hire them. But it’s actually quite difficult to obtain a job on the Internet due to the high volume of resumes submitted. The number one method to obtain a job is by networking.”

2. Being Too Choosy –“Many students get so focused on a specific job or organization that they don’t realize there are other roles and other types of organizations that might be really good opportunities for them too."

3. Giving Up Too Early – “Some students think that given the poor job market, it’s not worth the time to search for a job. But many companies are now recruiting students this spring and through the summer. Our biggest problem is getting students to pay attention and apply for these jobs.”

4. Mis-using the Grad School Option – “For some people, grad school is a great option, but if you’re just doing it as a back up because you can’t find a job, it’s a very expensive back up. Grad school does not necessarily increase your job prospects – and the pressure can be even greater if you took on loans or don’t like your area of study and the types of opportunities it provides.”

5. Not using the college’s career office – “Students don’t realize that their career office can help them identify networking contacts, learn important job search skills, and significantly improve their resume and cover letter. It’s amazing how out of every 10 resumes, only one or two are very good, but 8 out of 10 are terrible.”