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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Minorities Drive Increase in Freshman Enrollment

Written by Caralee Adams on 29 June 2010.

More students are headed to college, and a large proportion of those freshmen are minorities. A report, "Minorities and the Recession-Era College Enrollment Boom," released today by the Pew Research Center reveals the recent increase in the size of freshman classes at four-year colleges, community colleges, and trade schools has been driven largely by a sharp increase in minority-student enrollment.

The analysis of new data from the U.S. Department of Education looks at the freshman classes at 6,100 institutions from the fall of 2007 to the fall of 2008. There was a 6 percent increase in enrollment—the largest in 40 years—with a record 2.6 million first-time, full-time freshmen enrolled in 2008. Minority students were a big part of the reason. In that time frame, Hispanic enrollment grew by 15 percent, African-Americans by 8 percent, and whites by 3 percent.

This is, in part, a reflection of the demographic change in the nation. Also, Hispanics are completing high school at record rates—70 percent in 2008, up by 2.5 percent over the previous year according to the report. The report suggests that youths do adapt to circumstances and they are seeking education to boost their marketability during this economic downturn.

So where are minority college students going to school? Enrollment was up at all types of institutions, but more are enrolling in community colleges and trade schools than four-year colleges. Freshman classes at private for-profit institutions grew at a faster rate than others, with an 11 percent surge in enrollment. This increase and the high debt that students often face at these institutions has the private, for-profit sector under scrutiny. (See Monday's post.)

It's too early to tell if this trend has continued because data are not yet available. But as the United States becomes increasingly diverse, so will higher education. How will campuses and policymakers respond to make sure all students are not only welcomed but also supported all the way through graduation?