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West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

Special to the NNPA from the St. Louis American

The Target parking lot of the Buzz Westfall Shopping Center was filled with dozens and dozens of police vehicles and the area of West Florissant from Jennings to Ferguson was blocked off. Helicopters and tanks –as well as vehicles from a host of area departments – descended on West Florissant as looting and vandalism…

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Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

By Peter Grear

Our campaign has sought to educate our communities to the point that they would organize and mobilize for a massive voter turnout for the November General Election and beyond. 

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Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Study author Susan R. Fisk

“On the surface, risky situations may not appear to be particularly disadvantageous to women, but these findings suggest otherwise,” 

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Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

By Peter Grear

To properly understand where we are today, we must look to history, to Black Slavery.  Slavery has existed since the time of ancient civilizations and in its inception was based upon conquerors enslaving the conquered without regards to race.  

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Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Charlotte, NC (BlackPR.com)

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a business executive, was installed as the 2014-2018 International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated (AKA)

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Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

New York (BlackPR.com)

New York (BlackPR.com) -- Nielsen today announced that Andrew McCaskill has joined Nielsen as Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications. He will report to Chief Communications Officer Laura Nelson.

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Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Written by Peter Grear

With this article we will start detailing the ingredients of a revisable action plan that needs comments and revisions as we move toward the Tuesday, November 4, 2014 General Election.  

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Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Written by Peter Grear

Educate, Organize and Mobilize: I confess that I’m amazed. The Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of North Carolina announced last week that they have launched theNorth Carolina Black Advisory Board (BRAB) 

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In Parent-Teacher Conferences, It’s Often Not About the Student

Written by Featured Organization on 11 September 2010.

Parents will soon face the often-dreaded parent-teacher conference. But what seems to be an evaluation of student performance is more often than not an evaluation of the parent and the teacher, by each other. Danielle Pillet-Shore, assistant professor of communication at the University of New Hampshire has been studying parent-teacher interactions for a decade.

What she has found has surprised her. Most people think of parent-teacher conferences as occasions wholly dedicated to the assessment and evaluation of the student - a kind of student performance review focused on how the child is doing in school, akin to performance appraisals done annually for employees in organizations. But what's really going on beneath the surface is an assessment and evaluation of one another.

"Parents and teachers behave in a way suggesting that they are each treating the conference as an occasion for their own performance review - using the student's progress, or lack thereof, as a gauge of how the teacher is doing at his or her job of 'being a teacher' and how the parent is doing at his or her job of 'being a parent,'" Pillet-Shore says.

So parent and teacher face a dilemma: How do they each display that they are "good" at their jobs given that they perform much of those jobs outside of direct observation by one another?

The parents' solution may surprise many. Instead of defending their children, parents are consistently critical about their children when talking with teachers, often delivering unsolicited, negative information about them.

"Parents use their criticisms as vehicles for accomplishing several goals, including showing that they already know about their children's potential or actual troubles, displaying that they are fair appraisers of their own children, willing and able to detect and articulate their flaws, and reporting on their own efforts to improve or remedy their children's faults, shortcomings or problems," Pillet-Shore says.

As the researcher explains, parents' criticisms of their own children provide them the opportunity to display to teachers what kind of parent they are - alert, attentive, observant, responsive and actively involved in helping their children improve - key qualifications for claiming one's status as a "good parent."

"In short, during parent-teacher conferences, parents manifest a pervasive concern to show teachers, 'I'm a good parent,' " Pillet-Shore says.

For their part, teachers regularly work to encourage parents to be first to articulate critical assessments of the student, such as by asking for the parent's perspective, observations, questions, and/or concerns about the student's progress.

"Doing this makes the teacher's job easier. Allowing parents the opportunity to articulate potential/actual student troubles first enables teachers to subsequently agree with and build upon what the parent has already said. And doing this also makes the parent's job easier, since a fundamental way to present oneself as a 'good parent' is to display that one already knows about any problematic aspects of the student/child's academic performance or behavior," Pillet-Shore says.

Contrary to the common perception that teachers are overly critical of students, solely focused on identifying and reporting their troubles and problems, the researcher has found that overwhelmingly and throughout the duration of the parent-teacher conference, teachers instead work to keep talk about students relatively positive and optimistic.

For example, teachers often respond to parents' criticisms of students by providing face-saving accounts on students' behalf (e.g. "That's not atypical of kids"; "For a 12-year-old boy, normal is pretty flaky.")

Teachers also work to create and maintain a favorable stance toward students by, for example, delineating what the student "knows" versus what the student "shows she knows," and promising a natural resolution of the current trouble.

"It is the teacher who consistently works to end the parent-teacher conference interaction on a positive note, delivering future-oriented, favorable or optimistic comments about the student," Pillet-Shore says.

The University of New Hampshire, founded in 1866, is a world-class public research university with the feel of a New England liberal arts college. A land, sea, and space-grant university, UNH is the state's flagship public institution, enrolling more than 12,200 undergraduate and 2,200 graduate students.

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