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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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Study Looks at Discrimination African-American Adolescents Face in Schools

Written by Featured Organization on 17 June 2013.

Nearly 60 years after the Supreme Court outlawed racial segregation in public schools, African-American adolescents of all socioeconomic backgrounds continue to face instances of racial discrimination in the classroom. A new study sheds light on that and points to the need for students of color to rely on personal and cultural assets to succeed academically.

The study “African American Adolescents’ Academic Persistence: A Strengths-Based Approach,” was published online May 24 in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

“This study is unique in that it is a socioeconomically diverse sample of African-American adolescents — from poverty and low-income environments all the way to those with a high socioeconomic status,” said Sheretta T. Butler-Barnes, PhD, assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and lead author.

“School-based racial discrimination experiences are still occurring across the board for these adolescents, and it’s having a negative impact on academic persistence,” she said.

Butler-Barnes said that’s not so much surprising as it is distressing. “It’s 2013 and it’s still an issue,” she said.

The study began when Butler-Barnes was a National Science Foundation post-doctoral fellow at the University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context. While not letting schools and institutions off the hook, the research also focuses on ways that an individual’s strengths — racial pride, self-efficacy and self-acceptance — can buffer the negative experiences.

“The study keys in to teachers and parents the need to recognize that these things are still happening,” Butler-Barnes said, noting that schools could hold workshops speaking about race and ethnic differences to raise awareness of what people of color tend to experience in school settings.

Butler-Barnes led the first phase of this research, which is ongoing at the University of Michigan. To view the study, visit here.

Co-authors are Tabbye M. Chavous, PhD, professor and associate dean for academic programs and initiatives at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies at the University of Michigan; Noelle Hurd, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Virginia; and Fatima Varner, PhD, assistant professor at Fordham University.

Butler-Barnes joined the faculty of the Brown School in July. Her research explores positive youth development, specifically African-American adolescents and achievement outcomes, and seeks to identify strengths regardless of socioeconomic status. •