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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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The Danger Behind the Decline of Newspapers

Written by Saint Joseph's University on 17 March 2009.

Considering all the layoffs, downsizes and cutbacks reported these days, it's not surprising that the news itself is being cut back. According to Joe Samuel Starnes, visiting assistant professor of English at Saint Joseph's University, "You don't have to look far to see struggling businesses, but newspapers have been going down for a while because of the loss of advertising revenue and readership."

In response to the newspaper industry's decline, he said, "It's concerning because our democracy needs good journalism, and newspapers have supplied and supported a majority of our country's high-quality reporting in the past. If they go away, I don't know if blogs or news sites will be able to replace that."

Newspapers are the best places for good journalism, Starnes said, because they have the manpower and resources to uncover and distribute vital information.

"There are blogs that do some interesting things, but for the most part I think it's dangerous for democracy to rely on these smaller news sites, because then there are fewer reporters knocking on doors and digging up stories. That's the worst part of seeing newspapers decline."

He continued, "Blogs usually employ a handful of people, or just one person, whereas a larger news agency has a bigger staff. Good, investigative reporting is expensive and needs a skilled workforce."

It all comes down to money, and when people started realizing they could advertise for free on Web sites such as craigslist.com, they stopped relying on the classified section of the newspaper. Furthermore, Starnes said that many people don't read the print versions and instead turn to the Internet for their news.

However, at the classroom level, Starnes hasn't seen a decline in journalism's popularity. "There will always be a desire to write, read, and learn how to tell stories. Reporting and journalism will need to transfer to the Web, so the challenge for these businesses will be to figure out how to do that successfully."

Starnes currently teaches several journalism classes, writes freelance for the New York Times, and has more than 20 years of experience in the newspaper and public relations industries.