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West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

Special to the NNPA from the St. Louis American

The Target parking lot of the Buzz Westfall Shopping Center was filled with dozens and dozens of police vehicles and the area of West Florissant from Jennings to Ferguson was blocked off. Helicopters and tanks –as well as vehicles from a host of area departments – descended on West Florissant as looting and vandalism…

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Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

By Peter Grear

Our campaign has sought to educate our communities to the point that they would organize and mobilize for a massive voter turnout for the November General Election and beyond. 

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Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Study author Susan R. Fisk

“On the surface, risky situations may not appear to be particularly disadvantageous to women, but these findings suggest otherwise,” 

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Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

By Peter Grear

To properly understand where we are today, we must look to history, to Black Slavery.  Slavery has existed since the time of ancient civilizations and in its inception was based upon conquerors enslaving the conquered without regards to race.  

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Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Charlotte, NC (BlackPR.com)

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a business executive, was installed as the 2014-2018 International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated (AKA)

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Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

New York (BlackPR.com)

New York (BlackPR.com) -- Nielsen today announced that Andrew McCaskill has joined Nielsen as Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications. He will report to Chief Communications Officer Laura Nelson.

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Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Written by Peter Grear

With this article we will start detailing the ingredients of a revisable action plan that needs comments and revisions as we move toward the Tuesday, November 4, 2014 General Election.  

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Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Written by Peter Grear

Educate, Organize and Mobilize: I confess that I’m amazed. The Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of North Carolina announced last week that they have launched theNorth Carolina Black Advisory Board (BRAB) 

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African-American Children Cope Well With Behavioral Risks

Written by University of Virginia on 16 November 2009.

 Melvin WilsonAn eight-year study of African-American, white and Hispanic-American children in three regions of the United States has found that African-Americans had the highest level of exposure to risk factors that could lead to behavioral problems, but do not engage in bad behavior at higher rates than the other two groups.

The finding by community-clinical psychologists at the University of Virginia, University of Pittsburgh, the University of Oregon and Oxford University, is published in the current edition of the journal Prevention Science.

The investigators followed a sample of participants at high risk for conduct disorders in Pittsburgh and in rural areas outside of Charlottesville, Va., and Eugene, Ore.

Risks included such factors as frequent moves, low or fluctuating family incomes, substance abuse by parents, absence of fathers, and living in dangerous neighborhoods. Acting-out behaviors would include defiant, noncompliant actions such as disrupting classrooms and hitting peers.

“We found that the African-American youths were exposed to more risk factors than the white or Hispanic populations in all three regions,” said Melvin Wilson, a professor of psychology at U.Va., who led the study. “But we discovered that they were no more vulnerable to child behavior problems than the other two populations.

“One of the key things we learned is that exposure to risk is different from vulnerability to the effects of risk,” he said. “As psychologists, we should just not look at risk exposure, but should go one step further to determine whether risk will lead to actual negative outcomes. Some children living with strong nurturing parents can develop resistance to many different risks.”

However, African-American children were more prone to “internalizing” their fears and problems, resulting in some anxiety issues. Wilson said this can lead to stress, sadness and other depressive symptoms.

The white and Hispanic groups were more prone to “acting out,” and expressing aggressive behaviors.

Wilson said the reason for this may be that people who are exposed to many risks may develop a sort of immunity, allowing them to better shrug off the negative experiences they have.

“They become adaptable,” Wilson said. “Although they are more likely to keep it inside.”

But people who are less exposed to risk are more likely to react to it because it is beyond their normal experience.

“Kids in quiet and calm two-parent homes are more likely to act out their negative feelings when exposed to bad situations, such as a divorce,” Wilson said, “whereas children who live with a single parent may be less vulnerable to trauma.”

Likewise, children in rural areas may experience stress by going to school in an urban area, but kids who already live in urban areas are used to the hustle and bustle of the urban setting.

Wilson and his colleagues are working with parents in their study groups to help children adapt to negative circumstances and to support positive child behaviors.

“We want to work at reducing exposure to bad experiences and conditions, but also design intervention programs to increase resistance to bad circumstances," Wilson said. "We are helping parents to be more positive in monitoring and managing their children.”

Wilson said parents can reinforce good behavior instead of being coercive to correct bad behavior.

“Parents are our greatest resource,” he said. “We are helping them to be positive and reinforcing for their kids. It works much better to reward good behavior rather than focusing on and punishing bad behavior. This gets kids on the right track, that there are positive results when they do well, and they will then more likely repeat those good behavior patterns.”

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