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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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African-American Children Cope Well With Behavioral Risks

Written by University of Virginia on 16 November 2009.

 Melvin WilsonAn eight-year study of African-American, white and Hispanic-American children in three regions of the United States has found that African-Americans had the highest level of exposure to risk factors that could lead to behavioral problems, but do not engage in bad behavior at higher rates than the other two groups.

The finding by community-clinical psychologists at the University of Virginia, University of Pittsburgh, the University of Oregon and Oxford University, is published in the current edition of the journal Prevention Science.

The investigators followed a sample of participants at high risk for conduct disorders in Pittsburgh and in rural areas outside of Charlottesville, Va., and Eugene, Ore.

Risks included such factors as frequent moves, low or fluctuating family incomes, substance abuse by parents, absence of fathers, and living in dangerous neighborhoods. Acting-out behaviors would include defiant, noncompliant actions such as disrupting classrooms and hitting peers.

“We found that the African-American youths were exposed to more risk factors than the white or Hispanic populations in all three regions,” said Melvin Wilson, a professor of psychology at U.Va., who led the study. “But we discovered that they were no more vulnerable to child behavior problems than the other two populations.

“One of the key things we learned is that exposure to risk is different from vulnerability to the effects of risk,” he said. “As psychologists, we should just not look at risk exposure, but should go one step further to determine whether risk will lead to actual negative outcomes. Some children living with strong nurturing parents can develop resistance to many different risks.”

However, African-American children were more prone to “internalizing” their fears and problems, resulting in some anxiety issues. Wilson said this can lead to stress, sadness and other depressive symptoms.

The white and Hispanic groups were more prone to “acting out,” and expressing aggressive behaviors.

Wilson said the reason for this may be that people who are exposed to many risks may develop a sort of immunity, allowing them to better shrug off the negative experiences they have.

“They become adaptable,” Wilson said. “Although they are more likely to keep it inside.”

But people who are less exposed to risk are more likely to react to it because it is beyond their normal experience.

“Kids in quiet and calm two-parent homes are more likely to act out their negative feelings when exposed to bad situations, such as a divorce,” Wilson said, “whereas children who live with a single parent may be less vulnerable to trauma.”

Likewise, children in rural areas may experience stress by going to school in an urban area, but kids who already live in urban areas are used to the hustle and bustle of the urban setting.

Wilson and his colleagues are working with parents in their study groups to help children adapt to negative circumstances and to support positive child behaviors.

“We want to work at reducing exposure to bad experiences and conditions, but also design intervention programs to increase resistance to bad circumstances," Wilson said. "We are helping parents to be more positive in monitoring and managing their children.”

Wilson said parents can reinforce good behavior instead of being coercive to correct bad behavior.

“Parents are our greatest resource,” he said. “We are helping them to be positive and reinforcing for their kids. It works much better to reward good behavior rather than focusing on and punishing bad behavior. This gets kids on the right track, that there are positive results when they do well, and they will then more likely repeat those good behavior patterns.”