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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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Beyond Black and White: Searching for the White Male Effect in the African-American Community

Written by Louie Rivers, Joseph Arvai and Paul Slovic on 30 January 2010.

white male effectA new study published this month concludes the tendency of some white males with higher education levels and conservative political and cultural views to have lower risk perceptions of environmental threats is not found among African-American males with similar backgrounds. The study also finds 69 percent of African-American men and women surveyed about their views on the environment and health risks are either “moderately” or “deeply” concerned about the natural environment.


“An initial examination of our survey results using the characteristics similar to those identified in previous studies of the White Male Effect (WME) — namely males who place a high degree of trust in experts and authority figures, who possess an above average level of education, and identify with a conservative political orientation — did not yield a group of African-Americans that perceived risks in a similar fashion to the men characterized by the WME,” the authors conclude.

The study, “Beyond a Simple Case of Black and White: Searching for the White Male Effect in the African-American Community,” was conducted by three experts, Louie Rivers and Joseph Arvai of Michigan State University, and Paul Slovic of Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon. The findings appear in the January 2010 issue of the journal Risk Analysis, published by the Society for Risk Analysis.

The authors used the survey results to examine the factors driving risk perception in the African-American community. They hypothesized African-American males with backgrounds and worldviews similar to their white counterparts also would share the latter group’s tendency to hold lower perceptions of environmental and health risks compared to the broader public. The WME is considered important because a number of policymakers and managers in society fit these demographic criteria and thus may have views on risks inconsistent with the public at large.

The results from another part of the study, which included both African-American men and women, “. . . challenge the anecdotal, yet increasingly pervasive, suggestion that African-Americans — especially those who live in urban and suburban areas (where our samples were drawn) — have become largely unconcerned about, and disassociated from, the natural environment,” according to the authors. The study was not based on a random sample but a sample of convenience. However, it drew from a regionally diverse population involving 403 respondents alerted through announcements in regions including Ohio, North Carolina, Maryland and Kentucky.

In terms of specific findings, the research concludes black men tend to have lower risk perceptions about environmental and health issues than black women, and that age, education, trust in authority, sense of control, and political orientation also are not correlated with their both men and women’s levels of risk perception.