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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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Can You Invest in the Eradication of Human Misery?

Written by University of Virginia's Darden School of Business on 25 March 2010.

Darden School of Business Offers Course on Markets in Human Hope

Three Darden School of Business professors believe you can, and they are guiding students through an unusual course called “Markets in Human Hope.’’

 

The goal: treat “social’’ entrepreneurs in poverty-stricken areas who have great ideas and good products just like everyday entrepreneurs. Lend them money, invest in their potential, and odds are wealth creation will blossom.

Professors Saras D. Sarasvathy and Frank Warnock, and Batten Fellow Veronica Cacdac Warnock joined forces to create the course they hope will help change how we approach the seemingly intractable problem of poverty.

“It comes down to economic development,’’ says Veronica Warnock, who saw her share of privation in the Philippines where she grew up. “It’s poverty alleviation in a financially sustainable way. It’s getting away from dependence on donor funds.’’

“Funding is so messed up in the social sector,’’ says Prof. Sarasvathy. “Why don’t we invest in solutions to human misery instead of donating money?’’

Sarasvathy sees not just credit markets but a whole panoply of financial instruments – bonds, futures, mutual funds – being used to bankroll social entrepreneurship or franchise programs that develop human potential and thus profit. In her book titled Effectuation: Elements of Entrepreneurial Expertise, she writes, “My position is that since all economic value ultimately derives from human beings, investments in the eradication of human misery should be both viable and valuable … all markets are ultimately markets in human hope.’’

There are about 100 countries where access to credit is practically non-existent, says Frank Warnock, who spent two years in the Peace Corp teaching in the poverty-ridden country of Malawi in southeast Africa. “No matter how good an idea, the average Malawian had no way of funding it,’’ he says. “It was amazing to see the difference it made to have access to capital.’’

In the course, Darden students are asked to come up with private sector solutions for long-standing social dilemmas such as lack of credit. Two years ago, for example, a student worked on turning wool made by Tibetans – a good, sellable product – into a business instead of an operation funded by charity. “We wanted to know how this could be done in a business context,’’ says Frank Warnock.

The classes – which are really workshops with the professors acting as coaches – began as a doctoral course in 2006 for which MBA students showed up and wanted in. Now the classes are part of the Darden curriculum and are taught each year.

Students take their ideas and help each other develop them with guidance from the professors. Though many of the ideas might not take off by the end of the course, says Frank Warnock, the best will be passed down to new students and eventually implemented.

“What we have is a seed of an idea,’’ says Sarasvathy. “We see the students as innovative farmers who will experiment, crossbreed and cultivate a variety of new ideas and new instruments that they can nurture as they go forward into their chosen careers. We hope those seeds grow in ways we haven’t even thought of.’’

Students are now required to go on a field study to face poverty head on. The class will leave March 2 for South Africa for 10 days of meetings with entrepreneurs large and small. The hope is these future business leaders will eventually tilt successfully at the windmill.

“We hope this is where business and society are headed as a whole,’’ says Sarasvathy.

Founded in 1954, the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business improves society by developing principled leaders in the world of practical affairs.