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Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Research Duke Medicine

  DURHAM, N.C. – A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress.

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 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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Voter Suppression:  One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

Voter Suppression: One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

By Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Around 30 days and counting, this election season is in the home stretch.  The highest profile race is for US Senate between Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis.  

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Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

by Peter Grear

As we draw nearer to D-day, November 4, 2014, the political parties, candidates and pressure groups are identifying their issues, slates and strategies to win.  My title to this week’s commentary makes a gross understatement, judges matter. 

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Enduring Images Captured the Conscience of the Nation

Written by Maureen Costello on 31 March 2010.

A powerful collection of Civil Rights-era photographs is on display now through August 2010 at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. If you can’t organize a class trip to the museum, consider taking your students on a virtual tour of the era.

But don’t stop with just a tour. Offer students a way to analyze the photos so they can build skills while learning about the modern American Civil Rights Movement.

The photos vividly illustrate how individuals, acting alone or in concert, can bring about change. Image after image shows people marching, praying and fighting for justice. And behind each image is a photographer who captured the nation’s conscience.

Here are some basics to tackle when using photos in class. Ask kids to describe what they see—people, objects, actions. Can they tell where or when a photo was taken? How do they feel as they view each photo? What isn’t seen but can be inferred? What questions does a particular photo raise about justice and equality today?

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