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West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

Special to the NNPA from the St. Louis American

The Target parking lot of the Buzz Westfall Shopping Center was filled with dozens and dozens of police vehicles and the area of West Florissant from Jennings to Ferguson was blocked off. Helicopters and tanks –as well as vehicles from a host of area departments – descended on West Florissant as looting and vandalism…

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Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

By Peter Grear

Our campaign has sought to educate our communities to the point that they would organize and mobilize for a massive voter turnout for the November General Election and beyond. 

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Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Study author Susan R. Fisk

“On the surface, risky situations may not appear to be particularly disadvantageous to women, but these findings suggest otherwise,” 

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Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

By Peter Grear

To properly understand where we are today, we must look to history, to Black Slavery.  Slavery has existed since the time of ancient civilizations and in its inception was based upon conquerors enslaving the conquered without regards to race.  

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Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Charlotte, NC (BlackPR.com)

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a business executive, was installed as the 2014-2018 International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated (AKA)

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Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

New York (BlackPR.com)

New York (BlackPR.com) -- Nielsen today announced that Andrew McCaskill has joined Nielsen as Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications. He will report to Chief Communications Officer Laura Nelson.

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Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Written by Peter Grear

With this article we will start detailing the ingredients of a revisable action plan that needs comments and revisions as we move toward the Tuesday, November 4, 2014 General Election.  

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Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Written by Peter Grear

Educate, Organize and Mobilize: I confess that I’m amazed. The Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of North Carolina announced last week that they have launched theNorth Carolina Black Advisory Board (BRAB) 

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Preventing AIDS Deaths in Blacks

Written by Rebecca Nuttall on 12 March 2010.

(NNPA) – Although the number of HIV infections is growing at an alarming rate throughout the Black community, African-American women are the group most disproportionately affected. While representing only 12 percent of the U.S. female population, they account for 61 percent of all new HIV infections among women. “African-American women are 20 times more likely to get infected with HIV than White women,” said Dr. Debbie Hagins, clinical director of outpatient services for the Chatham County Health Department IDC Clinic. “This is in part due to the increased likelihood of being exposed to HIV through heterosexual contact because HIV is so prevalent in communities of color.”

In an era where an HIV diagnosis is no longer a death sentence due to the advent of new medications, many will not be alarmed by these statistics. However, this is only one of a number of HIV/AIDS disparities facing the African-American community, most of which are preventable.

Hagins is an investigator in the GRACE (Gender, Race And Clinical Experience) study, a clinical research study sponsored by Tibotec Therapeutics that examined gender and race differences in response to HIV medication. The study demonstrated that HIV medications are effective when taken as prescribed for men and women.

“HIV disease in the 21st century is very treatable. While medicine does not cure HIV/AIDS, it does offer effective treatment by suppressing viral replication.  The medicines work best if they are taken everyday,” Hagins said. “Factors that help HIV+ persons take their medicines daily include having medications that are well tolerated, medicines that can be taken once or twice a day, and regimens having as fewest pills possible to take.”

Despite medication, African-Americans die ten times more than Whites from HIV/AIDS and AIDS is the number 1 cause of death in young AA women aged 25-34.

“A number of factors contribute to this—some we can control—some we cannot.  Far too many African-Americans learn of their positive status very late in the course of their disease which increases the risk of disability and death,” Hagins said. “Also, many African-Americans come into medical treatment months to years after learning of their diagnosis, also contributing to an increased risk of dying.”

Hagins said other socioeconomic factors also contribute to these disparities such as access to care and medications. These same factors that contribute to increased mortality rates also account for increased infection rates.

“For a long time African-Americans did not recognize that HIV was prevalent in African-American communities so did not fully appreciate the potential and real threat of this disease,” Hagins said. “Because of misperceptions about HIV many people did not and still do not understand transmission of the virus so did not take measures to prevent its spread. HIV has spread silently in the communities of color for too long. Because of stigma and fears surrounding an HIV diagnosis, many do not get tested or do not seek and remain in treatment once they have been diagnosed.”

The GRACE study showed that that successful management of HIV comes from a combination of support and appropriate treatment. For this reason it is important for those living with the disease to connect with local HIV community groups for information and a broad range of support services.

“One of the lessons learned from the GRACE study is that keeping people of color engaged in medical care, especially women infected with HIV, has many contributing factors,” Hagins said. “The GRACE study learned that for reasons not related to lack of response to medications, some HIV+ African-Americans have other challenges than just their HIV diagnosis. There are also challenges in taking their medications as prescribed and in remaining in medical treatment.”

“African-American women are 20 times more likely to get infected with HIV than White women,” said Dr. Debbie Hagins, clinical director of outpatient services for the Chatham County Health Department IDC Clinic. “This is in part due to the increased likelihood of being exposed to HIV through heterosexual contact because HIV is so prevalent in communities of color.”

In an era where an HIV diagnosis is no longer a death sentence due to the advent of new medications, many will not be alarmed by these statistics. However, this is only one of a number of HIV/AIDS disparities facing the African-American community, most of which are preventable.

Hagins is an investigator in the GRACE (Gender, Race And Clinical Experience) study, a clinical research study sponsored by Tibotec Therapeutics that examined gender and race differences in response to HIV medication. The study demonstrated that HIV medications are effective when taken as prescribed for men and women.

“HIV disease in the 21st century is very treatable. While medicine does not cure HIV/AIDS, it does offer effective treatment by suppressing viral replication.  The medicines work best if they are taken everyday,” Hagins said. “Factors that help HIV+ persons take their medicines daily include having medications that are well tolerated, medicines that can be taken once or twice a day, and regimens having as fewest pills possible to take.”

Despite medication, African-Americans die ten times more than Whites from HIV/AIDS and AIDS is the number 1 cause of death in young AA women aged 25-34.

“A number of factors contribute to this—some we can control—some we cannot.  Far too many African-Americans learn of their positive status very late in the course of their disease which increases the risk of disability and death,” Hagins said. “Also, many African-Americans come into medical treatment months to years after learning of their diagnosis, also contributing to an increased risk of dying.”

Hagins said other socioeconomic factors also contribute to these disparities such as access to care and medications. These same factors that contribute to increased mortality rates also account for increased infection rates.

“For a long time African-Americans did not recognize that HIV was prevalent in African-American communities so did not fully appreciate the potential and real threat of this disease,” Hagins said. “Because of misperceptions about HIV many people did not and still do not understand transmission of the virus so did not take measures to prevent its spread. HIV has spread silently in the communities of color for too long. Because of stigma and fears surrounding an HIV diagnosis, many do not get tested or do not seek and remain in treatment once they have been diagnosed.”

The GRACE study showed that that successful management of HIV comes from a combination of support and appropriate treatment. For this reason it is important for those living with the disease to connect with local HIV community groups for information and a broad range of support services.

“One of the lessons learned from the GRACE study is that keeping people of color engaged in medical care, especially women infected with HIV, has many contributing factors,” Hagins said. “The GRACE study learned that for reasons not related to lack of response to medications, some HIV+ African-Americans have other challenges than just their HIV diagnosis. There are also challenges in taking their medications as prescribed and in remaining in medical treatment.” •

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