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West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

West Florissant, Mo. Explodes in Protest of Police Shooting, More Than 30 Arrests

Special to the NNPA from the St. Louis American

The Target parking lot of the Buzz Westfall Shopping Center was filled with dozens and dozens of police vehicles and the area of West Florissant from Jennings to Ferguson was blocked off. Helicopters and tanks –as well as vehicles from a host of area departments – descended on West Florissant as looting and vandalism…

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Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

Suppress Voting, Impeach Obama and Close HBCUs

By Peter Grear

Our campaign has sought to educate our communities to the point that they would organize and mobilize for a massive voter turnout for the November General Election and beyond. 

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Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Risky Situations Increase Women’s Anxiety, Hurt Their Performance Compared to Men

Study author Susan R. Fisk

“On the surface, risky situations may not appear to be particularly disadvantageous to women, but these findings suggest otherwise,” 

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Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

Voter Suppression: An Existential Threat to Democracy

By Peter Grear

To properly understand where we are today, we must look to history, to Black Slavery.  Slavery has existed since the time of ancient civilizations and in its inception was based upon conquerors enslaving the conquered without regards to race.  

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Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

Charlotte, NC (BlackPR.com)

Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a business executive, was installed as the 2014-2018 International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated (AKA)

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Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

Nielsen Expands Communications Leadership Team with Key Media Relations Hire

New York (BlackPR.com)

New York (BlackPR.com) -- Nielsen today announced that Andrew McCaskill has joined Nielsen as Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications. He will report to Chief Communications Officer Laura Nelson.

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Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Voter Suppression: It’s Mobilization Time

Written by Peter Grear

With this article we will start detailing the ingredients of a revisable action plan that needs comments and revisions as we move toward the Tuesday, November 4, 2014 General Election.  

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Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Voter Suppression: NC Black Republican Advisory Board

Written by Peter Grear

Educate, Organize and Mobilize: I confess that I’m amazed. The Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of North Carolina announced last week that they have launched theNorth Carolina Black Advisory Board (BRAB) 

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The Return of the Black Entrepreneur

Written by Kimberly Weisul on 23 January 2009.

NNPA -- For all the ballyhoo about the role of entrepreneurs in helping the economy grow, there are precious few reliable statistics that tell us who becomes an entrepreneur, how they do it and why they succeed or fail.

In 1996, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation set out the change that, embarking on a major study on entrepreneurship. The study solicited views from 120 scholars, 33 universities, 64,622 households and 830 would-be entrepreneurs. The first report from the study, released at the end of September 2002, merely identifies nascent entrepreneurs — people who are in the process of trying to start a business. But it has already produced some surprising results.

The researchers found that about 6.2 percent of all adults are trying to start their own businesses, but that blacks are far more likely to do so than whites. Just 5.7 percent of white households included someone who was trying to start a company, vs. 9.5 percent of black ones. (The differences between Hispanics and other groups were not statistically significant).

Census data show blacks are far less likely to succeed: Blacks make up 12 percent of the population, but own just 4 percent of companies. By contrast, whites represent 75 percent of the population and own 85 percent of businesses. “Blacks are starting companies at greater rates, but there is something within the process that causes them to fall out at greater rates, too,” says Patricia Greene, a University of Missouri professor and co-author of the study, which raises two important questions: Why are blacks more likely to try to start a business, and why are they having such trouble succeeding?

Back to the future? There’s plenty of historical precedent for a thriving entrepreneurial culture among black Americans. The current high levels of black entrepreneurship could very well represent a resurgence rather than an unprecedented phenomenon. The 1910 census showed that blacks were more likely than whites to own companies, and nearly as likely as whites to be self-employed, according to Margaret Levenstein, an economics professor at the University of Michigan. But in 1910, over 90 percent of African American entrepreneurs worked in agriculture, where small businesses have long been in decline, vs. about two-thirds of whites. Even excluding agriculture, black men were still more likely to be entrepreneurs in 1910 than in 1990 — 6 percent vs. 4.4 percent.

John Butler, a professor at the University of Texas, shares the view that this isn’t the first time blacks have been more entrepreneurial than other groups. When he was growing up, he says, the most important person in the black community was “not only the teachers, but the teachers who had a business.” The business provided important security, says Butler. “You didn’t know when the hostility from the larger society was going to come up.” He suggests the current wave of entrepreneurs have been struck by the realization that “civil rights and voting is one thing, but economic opportunity is another ... I think magazines like Black Enterprise have brought the consciousness of having an enterprise back to black America.”

Zeal for self-employment doesn’t matter much if businesses can’t get off the ground and establish themselves. Potential explanations for the differences between different groups of entrepreneurs are mostly speculation: blacks may have less access to bank loans and other sources of funding, or may have less influential or less active personal networks.

Butler, for one, thinks money is the answer. “Household wealth is the most important thing” in determining if a new enterprise is successful, he says. But the average black household has just one-tenth the wealth of the average white household, enabling it to spend that much less money sustaining a startup.

Education’s Dividends. The study does hint at some reasons to be optimistic about the current crop of black entrepreneurs. Statistically, businesses started with substantial capital and run by an entrepreneur with a graduate degree are most likely to succeed. And the current wave of black entrepreneurs is heavily weighted toward the highly-educated and well-heeled.

Twenty-six percent of black men with some graduate school education are trying to start a business, vs. just 10 percent of white men. On the income front, 16 percent of black men making more than $76,000 a year are trying to start a business vs. 10 percent of whites. These characteristics may help them thrive where other black entrepreneurs have struggled. The next phase of the study, due out next year, should begin to provide some hard answers.

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