You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials
Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

Read More...
Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

Read More...
Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

Read More...
Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

Read More...
Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

Read More...
Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

Read More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.
Print

Opportunity Evaluation in Entrepreneurship

Ask a successful entrepreneur what question they are most often asked at a dinner party, and they’ll most likely tell you that people want to know how to decide if their business idea is one that can be successful?

How do entrepreneurs evaluate opportunities to produce future good and services? What influences are brought to bear on those evaluations? To date, such questions remained largely unanswered by entrepreneurship research. However a new study by J. Michael Haynie, assistant professor of entrepreneurship, takes an important step toward opening the ‘black box’ inside the heads of successful entrepreneurs to understand how they evaluate future opportunities. Haynie suggests that opportunity evaluation in an entrepreneurial environment is about envisioning the future – specifically the wealth generating resources that would be under the control of the entrepreneur if he or she was to act to exploit the opportunity under consideration.

Haynie tests this notion by looking at more than 2,300 opportunity evaluation decisions from a large sample of entrepreneurs, and finds that opportunity evaluation is future-focused. “This means that the entrepreneur evaluates the opportunity almost as if it was a resource, and considers the wealth that resource could generate if it were exploited,” explains Haynie.

Further, Haynie finds that opportunity evaluation represents a first-person assessment. Haynie explains: “The entrepreneur’s evaluations of whether or not to act on a potential opportunity are not focused on whether the opportunity is attractive to ‘someone’, but whether the opportunity is attractive to ‘me’.”

It appears that entrepreneurs assess opportunities as more attractive when those opportunities relate to their existing knowledge, skills, and abilities. “However, there are certain conditions under which entrepreneurs might be attracted to opportunities inconsistent with their existing human capital,” says Haynie. “These include the rarity of the opportunity, limits on competition, and the age of the firm when considering the value of an opportunity.”

Haynie explains that when these conditions are encountered, entrepreneurs become more willing to try something new and step beyond their existing competencies. Because entrepreneurs have often been characterized as having unique mindsets, Haynie’s article further examines the complex decision-making processes of an entrepreneur, finding that some entrepreneurs seek not the perfect opportunity but the imperfect opportunity that is more perfect for them.

“Opportunity evaluation is about envisioning the future,” says Haynie. “Specifically, the wealth generating resource combinations to be controlled by the entrepreneur post-exploitation. This indicates that the processes associated with discovery, evaluation, and exploitation can and should be framed by considerations of existing and future resources.”

Ultimately, these insights reveal that opportunity evaluation is founded on future-oriented cognitive representations of ‘what will be’. The results are published in a 2009 edition of Journal of Management Studies, and the article is co-authored by Dean A. Shepherd and Jeffry S. McMullen from Indiana University