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AT&T Faces $10 Billion Race Discrimination Suit

Written by Freddie Allen, Sr. Washington Correspondent on Monday, 15 December 2014 20:19.

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – A group that advocates for economic inclusion and fair contracting for Black-owned media recently filed a $10 billion dollar lawsuit alleging racial discrimination against AT&T and DirecTV. The National Association of African American Owned Media (NAAAOM) filed the lawsuit for an unnamed company that “owns seven original content, high definition television networks (channels), six of which were launched to public in 2009 and one in 2012” and according to the complaint “is the only 100 percent African American-owned video programming producer and multi-channel operator/owner in the United States.” The suit alleges that AT&T and DirecTV violated a federal statute (Title 42 U.S. Code 1981) found in the Civil Rights Act of 1866, a law that was originally designed to protect freed slaves from discrimination as they joined the labor market and entered business contracts.

Political Correctness in Diverse Workplace Fosters Creativity

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 08 December 2014 16:01.

People may associate political correctness with conformity but new research finds it also correlates with creativity in work settings. Imposing a norm that sets clear expectations of how women and men should interact with each other into a work environment unexpectedly encourages creativity among mixed-sex work groups by reducing uncertainty in relationships.

Women Outperform Men in Some Financial Negotiations, Research Finds

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 08 December 2014 16:05.

WASHINGTON -– In certain circumstances, women may be more effective than men when negotiating money matters, contrary to conventional wisdom that men drive a harder bargain in financial affairs, according to a new meta-analysis published by the American Psychological Association. "One reason men earn higher salaries than women could be women's apparent disadvantage vis-à-vis men in some types of negotiations," said lead author Jens Mazei, a doctoral candidate at Germany's University of Münster. "But we discovered that this disadvantage is not inevitable; rather, it very much depends on the context of the negotiation."

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Written by Featured Organization on Tuesday, 02 December 2014 13:48.

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does, according to Baylor University researchers. Higher levels of commitment are associated with less absenteeism, lower turnover and less seeking of jobs outside the company. The study — “Small, local and loyal: How firm attributes affect workers’ organizational commitment” — is published in the journal Local Economy.

Group Focuses on Developing Black CEOs

Written by Freddie Allen, Senior Washington Correspondent on Monday, 24 November 2014 17:12.

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – In an effort to increase the relevancy of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) redesigned one of its signature programs to cultivate Black industry leaders at the corporate level. Johnny Taylor, president and CEO of TMCF, a HBCU membership group focused on increasing access, retention and graduation rates of students and creating a pipeline of high-qualified graduates for employers, said that the group got off base with its leadership program.

Startups Should Seek Quality Not Quantity for Partnerships

Written by Featured Organization on Tuesday, 11 November 2014 13:39.

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- When partnering with larger companies, startups with a small number of carefully chosen alliances will reap the most benefits, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management. Forthcoming in Organization Science, the study found that by aligning with established companies, a young firm gains valuable access to additional resources and markets. However, as a startup adds more outside partners, eventually the firm’s internal capability will weaken and the cost of maintaining its alliances will exceed any remaining benefits.