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Bullies in the Workplace: Victims to Tell Their Story

Written by Featured Organization on Tuesday, 21 October 2014 12:52.

AMES, Iowa – The stories are shocking and heartbreaking, but they are often disjointed and hard to follow. In severe cases, the narratives are even more chaotic. This is reality for victims of workplace bullying and a major reason why they stay silent, said Stacy Tye-Williams, an assistant professor of communications studies and English at Iowa State University. No one expects to go to work and feel as though they are back on the school playground, but bullying is all too common for many workers. Approximately 54 million workers, or 35 percent of U.S. employees, are targeted by a bully at some point in their careers, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute. Instead of reporting it, Tye-Williams found several of the people she interviewed for a study, published in Management Communication Quarterly, suffered silently.

Women Face Dishonesty in Business More Often Than Men During Negotiations

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 13 October 2014 16:04.

Women in business negotiations face more deceit than men, according to new research. In a study to be published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, researchers found that women are usually at a disadvantage during negotiations. “We found that men and women alike were targeting women with more deception than men,” said Jessica Kennedy, assistant professor of management at the Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management and co-author of the new research. “It was interesting that men and women alike tried to deceive women in negotiations.”

African American Female Entrepreneur Creates the Heartbeat Music Academy to Provide Music Programs for Underserved and Homeless Impacted Youth

Written by Featured Organization on Tuesday, 30 September 2014 13:10.

San Diego, CA — The Heartbeat Music Academy, located in San Diego, California, was founded by entrepreneur and humanitarian, Tyra K. Hawthorne. Ms. Hawthorne, a native of Detroit, Michigan, created the academy out of memory of her childhood and remembrance of how music has helped her overcome childhood tragedies. The programs provided by the academy are designed to promote scholastic achievement and music education. Since the incorporation of the academy, two of her students were provided the opportunity to attend summer music programs at both the Berklee College of Music and Jackson State University.

Common Thread of Failure in Black Businesses Revealed

Written by Featured Organization on Friday, 19 September 2014 16:13.

Atlanta — A recent study conducted by the Entrepreneurs Incubator Institute revealed that black businesses fail at a rate 18 times higher than that of their white counterparts with the exact same qualifications. The report cited that blacks are unfairly expected to achieve at the same levels as whites due to the broad stroke comparisons. Devin Robinson, business and economics professor and founder of EII stated, “The failure in black businesses often starts from the owner’s youth and discriminatory factors. Most blacks are only motivated to become entrepreneurs when corporate America rejects them. This rejection is often due to a criminal conviction, culture disconnect, underperforming aptitude or something that happened to that person as a youth. In addition, schools often put more energy into high performing students, leading to even better performance out of them. Average or underperforming students are rarely given enough attention and development, leading to worse performances.”

GDN BOOK FEATURE: Business Owner Defeats Racial Inequality, Makes History New Biography Highlights the Life and Times of Henry G. Parks, Jr.

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 15 September 2014 13:30.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Introducing the first African American business owner to issue stock on Wall Street: Henry G. Parks, Jr. “Businessman First” by Maurice W. Dorsey captures the important achievements of “Mr. Parks,” an African American manufacturing business owner who built his company to a multimillion-dollar level during the 1960s when racial inequality was especially prevalent.  “A business man who manufactures pork products is not viewed as glamorous,” Dorsey said. “But Mr. Parks had a great vision, mission, goals, objectives, and more over, a great product.” This new biography is an answer to the lack of recognition of Parks’ journey to success in African American history. A joint project between the author and the subject prior to his death, “Businessman First” highlights the strategy, dedication and perseverance Mr. Parks orchestrated to build his company from the ground up. The multi-generational friendship between these two African American men influenced the author’s own successful career in government and education. Dorsey’s 16-year friendship with Parks emphasizes the need for strong African American leaders to mentor youth today.

Africa’s Republic of Guinea, Conakry’s First Lady Visits Atlanta on International Business Relations Trip

Written by Featured Organization on Tuesday, 02 September 2014 13:37.

Her Excellency First Lady Madame Djene Conde' of The Republic of Guinea. S. Benjamin Enterprises Spearheads Tours of Governor's Office, CDC, MedShare International. Madame Djéné Condé, the First Lady of the Republic of Guinea, Conakry in Africa, took a series of tours in Atlanta, Georgia, during a recent visit to the United States. Madame Condé was on an exploratory mission for international business development between the Republic of Guinea, Conakry and Georgia, which included a private meeting with Georgia's First Lady, Sandra Deal.

 

 

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