Books of Knowledge

A Girl Stands at the Door: The Generation of Young Women Who Desegregated America’s Schools

By Rachel Devlin
“Before reading A Girl Stands at the Door I would have imagined that nothing new could be said about the struggle to desegregate schools—and I would have been wrong. Rachel Devlin has uncovered a neglected history of how parents and, importantly, children braved rejection, hostility, even assault to insist on their right to a decent education.

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What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America

By Michael Eric Dyson
The fraught conflict between conscience and politics – between morality and power – in addressing race hardly began with Clinton. An electrifying and traumatic encounter in the sixties crystallized these furious disputes.

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Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice That Restores

By Dominique DuBois Gilliard
The United States has more people locked up in jails, prisons, and detention centers than any other country in the history of the world. Mass incarceration has become a lucrative industry, and the criminal justice system is plagued with bias and unjust practices. And the church has unwittingly contributed to the problem.

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The Embattled Vote in America – From the Founding to the Present

Allan J. Lichtman
An alarming, important, perhaps even essential book. A noted authority on the history of American voting returns with a disturbing account of American political leaders who have, since the beginning of the republic, worked to limit the franchise.

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“The Sun Does Shine: How I found life and freedom on death row”

By Anthony Ray Hinton
In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty-nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence

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“Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race”

By Derald Wing Sue
If you believe that talking about race is impolite, or that “colorblindness” is the preferred approach, you must read this book. “Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence” debunks the most pervasive myths…

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The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League

By Jeff Hobbs
This moving biography recounts the life of Robert Peace, a young man who escaped the streets of Newark, New Jersey, to attend Yale University — only to lose his life after graduating.

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Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

By Monique Morris
Just 16 percent of female students, Black girls make up more than one-third of all girls with a school-related arrest. The first trade book to tell these untold stories.

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Edge of Chaos: Why Democracy Is Failing to Deliver Economic Growth and How to Fix It

By Dr. Dambisa Moyo
In Edge of Chaos, Dambisa Moyo shows why economic growth is essential to global stability, and why liberal democracies are failing to produce it today.

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Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires

By Shomari Wills
By telling the little-known stories of six pioneering African American entrepreneurs, Black Fortunes makes a worthy contribution to black history, to business history, and to American history.

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Who Lynched Willie Earle? Preaching to Confront Racism

By Will Willimon
By hearing black pain, naming white complicity, critiquing American exceptionalism/civil religion, inviting/challenging the church, and attending to African American pastors, this book helps pastors of white, mainline Protestant churches

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So You Want to Talk About Race

By Ijeoma Oluo
In “So You Want to Talk About Race”, editor at large of The Establishment Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the “N” word.

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‘Post-Racial or Most-Racial?’ Racial Attitudes and Their Effects on Modern American Politics

By Michael Tesler
Michael Tesler shows how, in the years that followed the 2008 election—a presidential election more polarized by racial attitudes than any other in modern times—racial considerations have come increasingly to influence many aspects of political decision making.

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The Myth of Equality: Uncovering the Roots of Injustice and Privilege

By Ken Wytsma
Yet if one were to ask a majority of white Americans, especially within the Church, about white privilege, most will get defensive and unwilling to even confront the reality of the issue.

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New Bestseller, “Mind Set Go,” Reveals the Simple Principles to Living a Renewed Life

Author, Business Coach, and Motivational Speaker, Derrick D. Reed has now released his new book titled Mind Set Go. In this riveting new release, Derrick sets out to reignite and help people identify the need for wholeness and the steps to

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‘Race to Judgment’ Dedicated to Memory of Brooklyn’s First Black District Attorney

By Frederic Block – Block’s book draws from his more than two decades on the federal bench and tackles such cases as the 1991 Crown Heights riot.

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“When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir”

By Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele’s
A poetic and powerful memoir about what it means to be a Black woman in America―and the co-founding of a movement that demands justice for all in the land of the free.

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Sing, Unburied, Sing – An Intimate Portrait of a Family and an Epic Tale of Hope

Jesmyn Ward – Sing, Unburied, Sing journeys through Mississippi’s past and present, examining the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power of family bonds.

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The Rise and Fall of the Associated Negro Press

By Professor Gerald Horne – For nearly fifty years, the Chicago-based Associated Negro Press (ANP) fought racism at home and grew into an international news organization abroad. At its head stood founder Claude Barnett …

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John Hope Bryant – The Memo: Five Rules for Your Economic Liberation

By John Hope Bryant – Rising up from economically disadvantaged circumstances, Bryant teaches readers five rules that lay the foundation for achieving financial freedom.

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The Wilmington Ten: Violence, Injustice, and the Rise of Black Politics in the 1970s

By Kenneth Janken – In February 1971, racial tension surrounding school desegregation in Wilmington, North Carolina, culminated in four days of violence and skirmishes.

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“Remembering the Power of Words” The Life of an Oregon Activist, Legislator, and Community Leader

By Avel Louise Gordly – “Words have power” is a constant undercurrent in Gordly’s account and a truth she learned early in life. “Growing up, finding my own voice,” she writes, “was tied up with denying my voice or having it forcefully rejected and in all of that the memory of my father is very strong.

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“Stokley, A Life” – Stokely Carmichael, Controversial Black Activist Called For “Black Power”

By Dr. Peniel Joseph – Stokely Carmichael, the charismatic and controversial black activist, stepped onto the pages of history when he called for “Black Power” during a speech one Mississippi night in 1966.

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“Obama: An Intimate Portrait” The Historic Presidency in Photographs

By Pete Souza

One of the early hot books of the holiday shopping seasons appears to be Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza, the White House photographer during Obama’s two terms. The $50 hardcover, published by Little, Brown

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The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition

Linda Gordon

By legitimizing bigotry and redefining so-called American values, a revived Klan in the 1920s left a toxic legacy that demands reexamination today. A new Ku Klux Klan arose in the early 1920s, a less violent but equally virulent descendant of the relatively small, terrorist Klan of the 1870s.

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Reversing Poverty One Job at a Time, This Guide Is a Helpful Start

By Leila Janah
Despite trillions of dollars in Western aid, 2.8 billion people worldwide still struggle in abject poverty. Yet the world’s richest countries continue to send money—mostly to governments—targeting the symptoms, rather than the root causes of poverty.

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Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race

Beverly Daniel Tatum
Beverly Daniel Tatum’s 1997 book on race relations — Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? — has become a modern classic in college and high school classrooms, used to educate and prompt healthy discussions among young people about race.

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Beyond the Messy Truth: How We Came Apart, How We Come Together

Author Van Jones
Van Jones burst into the American consciousness during the 2016 presidential campaign with an unscripted, truth-telling style and an already established history of bridge-building across party lines.

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The Hidden Rules of Race

Authors Andra Flynn, Dorian Warren, Felicia Wong & Susan Holmberg
The Hidden Rules of Race shows how the fight for racial equity has been one of progress and retrenchment, a constant push and pull for inclusion over exclusion. By understanding how our economic and racial rules work together, we can write better rules to finally address inequality in America.

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Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War

Author: Tony Horwitz
Bestselling author Tony Horwitz tells the electrifying tale of the daring insurrection that put America on the path to bloody war. Plotted in secret, launched in the dark, John Brown's raid …

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The Weeping Time: Story of a Slave Auction

Author Anne C. Bailey
In March of 1859, the largest sale of human beings in the history in the United States took place at a racetrack in Savannah, Georgia. During the two days of the sale, raindrops fell unceasingly on the racetrack. It was almost as though the heavens were crying.

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Download GDN Books of Knowledge Spotlight for October 2017

GDN has created one of the most empowering education initiatives detailing the 400-year Black experience in America. ‘GDN’s Books of Knowledge’ is a weekly go-to source where you can view videos and read reviews …

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We Were Eight Years in Power

Author Ta-Nehisi Coates
In his book Ta-Nehisi Coates examines the cause and effect between the unprecedented election of Barack Obama as the first Black president, to the vicious backlash that fueled the election of Donald Trump, a man Coates calls America’s “first white president.”

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From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.

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White Rage

Author Carol Anderson
From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.

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The Warmth of Other Suns

Author Isabel Wilkerson
In many ways The Warmth of Other Suns seeks to tell a new story—about the Great Migration of southern blacks to the north—and to set the record straight about the true significance of that migration. This book combines a sweeping historical perspective with vivid intimate portraits.

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Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism

Arthur James W. Loewen
In this groundbreaking work, bestselling sociologist James W. Loewen, author of the national bestseller Lies My Teacher Told Me, brings to light decades of hidden racial exclusion in America.

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The Blood of Emmett Till

Author Timothy B. Tyson
In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional.

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The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Author Richard Rothstein
The laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments—that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. There is no better history of this troubled journey than “The Color of Law.”

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Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

Author Cate Lineberry
It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old enslaved man named Robert Smalls boldly seized a Confederate steamer.

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A Colony in a Nation

Author Chris Hayes
America likes to tell itself that it inhabits a postracial world, yet nearly every empirical measure—wealth, unemployment, incarceration, school segregation—reveals that racial inequality has barely improved since 1968, when Richard Nixon became our first “law and order” president.

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Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution, and Imprisonment

Author Angela J. Davis
A comprehensive, readable analysis of the key issues of the Black Lives Matter movement, this thought-provoking and compelling anthology features essays by some of the nation’s most influential and respected criminal justice experts and legal scholars.

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In “Chokehold: Policing Black Men,” Attorney Paul Butler Takes on Police Brutality

Author Paul Butler
Police brutality in the Black community is as old as law enforcement itself.  Former federal prosecutor Paul Butler speaks in depth on the issue in his new book, “Chokehold: Policing Black Men.”

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Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond

Author Marc Lamont Hill
Heralded as an essential text for our times, Marc Lamont Hill’s galvanizing work embodies the best traditions of scholarship, journalism, and storytelling to lift unheard voices and to address the necessary question, “how did we get here?”

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Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II

Author Douglas A. Blackmon
Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War

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Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

Author James Forman, Jr.
Forman shows us that the first substantial cohort of black mayors, judges, and police chiefs took office amid a surge in crime and drug addiction.

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Book Feature: False Black Power?

Author Jason L. Riley
Black civil rights leaders have long supported ethnic identity politics and prioritized the integration of political institutions, and seldom has that strategy been questioned.

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On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City

Author Alice Goffman
Alice Goffman spent six years in one Philadelphia neighborhood, documenting the routine stops, searches, raids, and beatings that young men navigate as they come of age.

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Black Detroit: A People’s History of Self-Determination

Author Herb Boyd
The author of Baldwin’s Harlem looks at the evolving culture, politics, economics, and spiritual life of Detroit—a blend of memoir, love letter, history, and clear-eyed reportage …

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Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America

Author Ari Berman
There have been countless books written about the civil rights movement, but far less attention has been paid to what happened after the dramatic passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 …

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Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women

Authors Susan Burton & Cari Lynn
Forward by Michelle Alexander
One woman’s remarkable odyssey from tragedy to prison to recovery—and recognition as a leading figure in the national justice reform movement

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